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dc.contributor.authorMaliheh Zahedi Rad
dc.contributor.authorTirang Reza Neyestani
dc.contributor.authorBahareh Nikooyeh
dc.contributor.authorNastaran Shariatzadeh
dc.contributor.authorAli Kalayi
dc.contributor.authorNiloufar Khalaji
dc.contributor.authorAzam Gharavi
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T10:47:48Z
dc.date.available2017-09-18T10:47:48Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-27
dc.identifier.issn20088213
dc.identifier.urihttp://dsp.sbmu.ac.ir/xmlui/handle/123456789/66931
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Zahedi Rad M. Background: The most reliable indicator of Vitamin D status is circulating concentration of 25‑hydroxycalciferol (25(OH) D) routinely determined by enzyme‑immunoassays (EIA) methods. This study was performed to compare commonly used competitive protein‑binding assays (CPBA)‑based EIA with the gold standard, high‑pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Methods: Concentrations of 25(OH) D in sera from 257 randomly selected school children aged 9–11 years were determined by two methods of CPBA and HPLC. Results: Mean 25(OH) D concentration was 22 ± 18.8 and 21.9 ± 15.6 nmol/L by CPBA and HPLC, respectively. However, mean 25(OH) D concentrations of the two methods became different after excluding undetectable samples (25.1 ± 18.9 vs. 29 ± 14.5 nmol/L, respectively; P = 0.04). Based on predefined Vitamin D deficiency as 25(OH) D < 12.5 nmol/L, CPBA sensitivity and specificity were 44.2% and 60.6%, respectively, compared to HPLC. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the best cut‑offs for CPBA was 5.8 nmol/L, which gave 82% sensitivity, but specificity was 17%. Conclusions: Though CPBA may be used as a screening tool, more reliable methods are needed for diagnostic purposes.
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectCompetitive protein-binding assays
dc.subjectHigh-pressure liquid chromatography
dc.subjectVitamin D deficiency
dc.subjectVitamin D measurement
dc.titleCompetitive protein‑binding assay‑based enzyme‑immunoassay method, compared to high‑pressure liquid chromatography, has a very lower diagnostic value to detect vitamin D deficiency in 9–12 years children
dc.journal.volume2015
dc.journal.issueJULY
dc.identifier.doi10.4103/2008-7802.161069
dc.journal.pages
dc.contributor.authorid56767744800
dc.contributor.authorid6506263123
dc.contributor.authorid23982946500
dc.contributor.authorid23474989000
dc.contributor.authorid23485283500
dc.contributor.authorid18233617000
dc.contributor.authorid56767739600
dc.contributor.citation56767744800|60018934|Maliheh Zahedi Rad
dc.contributor.citation6506263123|60018934|Tirang Reza Neyestani
dc.contributor.citation23982946500|60018934|Bahareh Nikooyeh
dc.contributor.citation23474989000|60018934|Nastaran Shariatzadeh
dc.contributor.citation23485283500|60018934|Ali Kalayi
dc.contributor.citation18233617000|60018934|Niloufar Khalaji
dc.contributor.citation56767739600|60018934|Azam Gharavi
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934


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