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dc.contributor.authorSeyed Reza Mohebbi
dc.contributor.authorMohammad Rostami Nejad
dc.contributor.authorSeyed Mohammad Ebrahim Tahaei
dc.contributor.authorMohammad Amin Pourhoseingholi
dc.contributor.authorManijeh Habibi
dc.contributor.authorPedram Azimzadeh
dc.contributor.authorHamed Naghoosi
dc.contributor.authorPeter Karayiannis
dc.contributor.authorMohammad Reza Zali
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T09:58:22Z
dc.date.available2017-09-18T09:58:22Z
dc.date.issued2012-09-01
dc.identifier.issn18783503
dc.identifier.urihttp://dsp.sbmu.ac.ir/xmlui/handle/123456789/60923
dc.description.abstractHepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) are enteric hepatotropic viruses and their prevalence is related to the sanitary conditions of the region under investigation. There are only a few studies on the seroepidemiology of these two viruses in the general Iranian population. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the prevalence of hepatitis A and E infections in the general population.Between 2006 and 2007, a cross sectional study was performed in Tehran, Iran. Blood specimens were collected and questionnaires were filled in for 551 persons. Patient sera were tested by ELISA for anti-HEV and anti-HAV IgGs. The χ 2 test and independent t-test were used for statistical analysis and p < 0.05 was considered significant.The overall seroprevalence rates of anti-HEV IgG and anti-HAV IgG were 9.3% and 90%, respectively. The prevalence of antibodies to HAV and HEV was greater among men than women and incre ased with age. However, there was no significant relationship between age and gender with the existence of anti- HAV and HEV IgG antibodies.Our results show the seroprevalence of HAV and HEV antibodies are high and both viruses are endemic in this region. These findings are in accordance with results obtained from previous studies. We recommend that foreign travelers to Iran are vaccinated against HAV. © 2012 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
dc.sourceTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
dc.subjectHepatitis A
dc.subjectHepatitis E
dc.subjectIran
dc.subjectSeroepidemiology
dc.subjectTehran
dc.titleSeroepidemiology of hepatitis A and E virus infections in Tehran, Iran: A population based study
dc.journal.volume106
dc.journal.issue9
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.trstmh.2012.05.013
dc.journal.pages528-531
dc.contributor.authorid24722990900
dc.contributor.authorid56071994800
dc.contributor.authorid48661574900
dc.contributor.authorid15763511200
dc.contributor.authorid24381566300
dc.contributor.authorid36628006800
dc.contributor.authorid26031689700
dc.contributor.authorid24444813800
dc.contributor.authorid6602567324
dc.contributor.citation24722990900|60018934|Seyed Reza Mohebbi
dc.contributor.citation56071994800|60018934|Mohammad Rostami Nejad
dc.contributor.citation48661574900|60018934|Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim Tahaei
dc.contributor.citation15763511200|60018934|Mohammad Amin Pourhoseingholi
dc.contributor.citation24381566300|60018934|Manijeh Habibi
dc.contributor.citation36628006800|60018934|Pedram Azimzadeh
dc.contributor.citation26031689700|60018934|Hamed Naghoosi
dc.contributor.citation24444813800|60015150|Peter Karayiannis
dc.contributor.citation6602567324|60018934|Mohammad Reza Zali
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934
dc.contributor.affiliationid60015150
dc.contributor.affiliationid60018934


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